Fushimi Inari Shrine

I’ve always been fascinated with photos from Fushimi Inari Shrine, and I felt that my trip to Kyoto wouldn’t be complete without seeing it so I did!

Fushimi Inari Shrine is very accessible.  It’s just a few minutes-walk away from Keihan Electric Railway Mainline’s Fushimi Inari station.  JR’s Nara Line Inari Station is even closer to the shrine itself.

The thousand gates traversing Mt. Inari might be the most popular feature of the shrines, but there are several structures meant for private worship.  More than a photo op or two, Fushimi Inari Shrine certainly offers a taste of Japan’s history and spirituality.

And now, the pics!

There are food stalls and souvenir shops at the foot of the shrine, too.

For me, Fushimi Inari Shrine is definitely a must-see! Just make sure to wear comfortable shoes, get hydrated, and be prepared to climb.

Gyeongbokgung Palace

It felt like a Hunter exam, the one where Gon, Killua and the rest of the gang tried to keep up with the examiner Satotsu.  Only that we’re in the huuuuuuge Gyeongbokgung Palace Grounds, and the Satotsu in this situation is our tour guide who looks like a retired soldier.  We had to brisk-walk else we’d lose sight of him.

Gyeongbokgung is in the heart of Jongno-gu, a place rich in cultural and historical significance to South Korea.  Of the four palace complexes in Jongno-gu, Gyeonbokgung is not just the largest but is said to be the most beautiful as well.  Here are some of the highlights of our stop:

Operating Hours
November-February 09:00-17:00
March-May 09:00-18:00
June-August 09:00-18:30
September-October 09:00-18:00

* Last admission: 1 hr before closing

Closed on Tuesdays.

Admission Fees
[Korean Citizens]
Adults (ages 25-64): 3,000 won / Groups (10 people or more): 2,400 won

[International Visitors]
Adults (ages 19-64): 3,000 won / Groups (10 people or more): 2,400 won
Children (ages 7-18): 1,500 won / Group (10 people or more): 1,200 won

**Source

Gyeongbokgung is near Gyeongbokgung station on Seoul Subway Line 3.